TheMagic Christmas Train by @JinaBacarr #KindleScout

My friend Jina Bacarr is here today to tell us about her new release up at Kindle Scout, The Magic Christmas Train. After the excerpt, she explains the Kindle Scout program.

But first, the spectacular cover designed by Jina herself.

Magic Christmas Train cover

The Magic Christmas Train by Jina Bacarr

Who says you can’t go home again?

On a cold December day in 1955, I got on a train to go back home for Christmas.

This is the story of what happened when I got off that train.

In 1943.

I was engaged to be married back then, but the man I loved was called up for active duty and was killed. An old letter written after the war on army stationary tugged at my heart, detailing why the mission went wrong. What if I could change that? Warn him back in this time. Can I save his life?

Or will fate have a bigger surprise in store for me?


Short excerpt:
Kate is talking about the man she loves with her sister Lucy:

Posey Creek, Pennsylvania
December 12, 1943

I turned away so she didn’t see my cheeks tint. I get this way every time I think of Jeff. I’m in awe of his broad shoulders filling the doorway of his office down at the mill. Standing there and watching me when I walked by. Smiling. For a few blissful moments, everything around us stopped except for the constant hum of the machinery on the factory floor, the paper presses pounding out their never-ending rhythm.

I could barely keep walking, knowing he was watching me.

The memory of him touching me with his big, strong hands, his hard body so dangerously close to my softness made me crazy. I ached for him next to me at night, the rich, masculine smell of him filling me up when I closed my eyes. His hard body spooning next to me. I knew what I wanted.

I wanted Jeff to love me like a woman, to make me his.

And every day we waited made it harder when we were together. We’d get a little bit closer to losing control, his hand on my waist, then smoothing over my hip, and oh, God, when he ran his fingers up and down my thigh, I wanted to jump on his bones. Rip off his shirt and that funny tie he wore that was never straight, like he never took the time to fix it right. He was that kind of man. On the move, doing this, signing that, except when it came to me.

Then he loved me nice and slow.

Taking his time, but every night it was getting harder and harder to push him away.

I was so afraid the night would come when I couldn’t push him away.

Kindle Scout Info:

What is Kindle Scout and how does it work?

Kindle Scout is where you, the reader, choose which books are published!

If the book(s) you nominate are chosen for publication, then you receive a FREE advance copy from Amazon.

My Kindle Scout book is called “The Magic Christmas Train”

It’s a Holiday Time Travel romance:

Imagine if you could go back to a special Christmas, see family and friends you miss, and change the course of your life . . . and save the man you love from being killed overseas during World War 2.

So hop aboard the Magic Christmas Train and meet the Arden Family doing their best to support the troops during that Christmas of 1943.


author Jina BacarrAbout Jina Bacarr:

I discovered early on I inherited the gift of the gab from my large Irish family when I penned a story about a princess who ran away to Paris with her pet turtle Lulu. I was twelve. I grew up listening to their wild outlandish tales and it was those early years of storytelling that led to my love of history and traveling. I enjoy writing to classical music with a hot cup of java by my side. I adore dark chocolate truffles, vintage anything, the smell of bread baking, and rainy days in museums.

Connect with Jina online:

Once Upon a Story blog:


Remembering the Normandy #D-Day Landing Beaches #WWII #TuesdayTravels

Tuesday Travels

It has been seventy-three years since the Allies landed in France on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and still people travel to Normandy to see the beaches and visit the cemeteries.

My father served in North Africa and Italy during World War II, so I never planned to visit the D-Day beaches, but now I have done so twice. Once on a cruise around the British Isles, and again last October on a tour of Northern France. Both times I came away humbled by the sacrifices made there.

The D-Day invasion was a massive undertaking, with over 156,000 American, Canadian and British forces involved. Code named Operation Overlord, it was the largest amphibious landing in history.

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The father of one of the men are tour was an engineer, and one of the first to hit the beaches. The engineers were sent in first to clear the beaches of land mines, under enemy fire. There were many casualties, but his dad survived to tell the story. We were all impressed by his bravery under fire.

One of the most impressive sites is at Pointe du Hoc, the location of German bunkers that were shelled during the fighting before the Army Rangers climbed the cliffs to take the high ground. There’s a monument to them.

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The site has been pretty much left as it was after the battle, with the exception of the memorial and the grass and other plants that now grow there. It is a truly spectacular spot, with gorgeous ocean views. It’s hard to imagine what a hell it must have been seventy-three years ago.

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The most moving part of the day’s tour was the visit to the American Cemetery at Colville, not the only D-Day cemetery. On the way, we passed the site of the first American cemetery, now reduced to a single memorial stone. The Colville site is a beautiful cemetery, meticulously maintained. Gazing out at the rows and rows of grave markers, most with crosses on top, but some with Stars of David or crescents, drives home the extent of the sacrifices made that long-ago day, and the mere thought of it brings tears to my eyes.

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I’m feeling more poignant than usual this year, given the new cracks in the NATO Alliance that did much to stabilize the world order after World War II. I hope this will be a temporary rift between the US and our European friends and partners.