Writer Wellness, A Writer’s Path to Health and Creativity

Witer Wellness class graphic

The August OCC/RWA Online Class is:

Writer Wellness, A Writer’s Path to Health and Creativity
Aug. 10 – Sept. 6, 2020
with Joy Held

About the Class:

Writer Wellness, A Writer’s Path to Health and Creativity: Good self-care is the new multi-vitamin! Writers should still take a multi-vitamin, and Writer Wellness is a complimentary plan to help you stay on target for writing and life. WW is a lifestyle technique for anyone who loves to create with activities to stimulate creativity and health by encouraging regular journal writing, exercise, relaxation, good nutrition, and creative play. Regardless of style, genre, or writing goals, Writer Wellness is the perfect writer’s companion.

The workshop will offer three activities per key area (journaling, fitness, relaxation, nutrition, and creative play) for participant’s to try then respond to discussion prompts posted in the course. This interactive workshop will present ideas any writer can put into practice, tweak, and maintain throughout a writing career with the goal of better health and expanded creativity for many years. Discover the Writer Wellness Warrior in you and be well, write well.

About the Instructor:

JOY E. HELD, A.A.S., B.A., M.F.A. is an author, freelance editor, Yoga Alliance Registered yoga and meditation teacher, college English professor, certified Journal to the Self educator, and workshop presenter with over 500 articles published in trade magazines, newspapers, and literary journals. Her historical romance novel Message to Love was published in 2010 by The Wild Rose Press. Joy is a member of Romance Writers of America, Hearts Through History Romance Writers, Northeast Ohio RWA, and the Author’s Guild. She has degrees in education, journalism, and writing popular fiction. www.joyeheld.com.

Sign up and pay for the class here: http://occrwa.org/classes/online-class-three/

Fees are $20 for OCC/RWA members; $30 for non-members; $10 for OCC/RWA volunteers.

Note: OCC/RWA members who paid $55 for dues and wish to claim their free online class should email [email protected]

Linda McLaughlin
Online Class Coordinator

Celebrating the 19th Amendment for 4th of July

One hundred years ago, women finally won the right to vote in the United States of America. We weren’t “given” the right; our ancestors demanded the right to vote, for 70 years! I’m still appalled that it took so long. In honor of the centennial, I’m recycling this post from 2018.

Fourth of July graphic

Happy Fourth of July!

The Declaration of Independence states “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal…” But nowhere does it mention women.

When I was growing up, I was told that the word “men” was intended to refer to all mankind, including women, a comforting notion that satisfied my childish curiosity. However, I no longer believe that, in large part because I now know that Abigail Adams, wife of our second president and mother of the sixth, wrote to her husband John in March of 1776 with the words “remember the ladies”. Since I’m quite certain he did not have dementia at the time, it’s obvious that the ladies were deliberately excluded, as were enslaved men.

suffragette with sign

Yeah, they were pissed off. (Suffragette With A Sign
@ Therealdarla)

Nor are women mentioned in the US Constitution, and the right to vote is not delineated. In the early history of our nation, laws about who could vote were decided by each individual state. None allowed women to vote. Wyoming Territory gave women the right to vote in 1869, followed by Utah Territory (1870) and Washington Territory (1882). When the territories became states, they preserved women’s suffrage. It may seem odd that these Western states were the first, but given the fact that women were scarce in the Old West, I suspect suffrage was a way of attracting more women to settle in the Far West. Or perhaps the Western territories were more egalitarian, since there was no existing old-style patriarchy to run things, like there was back east. Hard to say for sure. You can find out what year your state first allowed women to vote at the National Constitution Center’s website.

My point is, women’s rights are not something we can take for granted. The right to vote was hard won by several generations of women, starting in 1848 and finally culminating in victory in 1920 by passage of the 19th Amendment, 130 years after the Constitution was ratified.

As our current president would say, “Sad.”

I hope to live long enough to see full gender equality.

Equality between man and woman

Equality between man and woman
@ BrianAJackson

In the meantime, have a happy and safe Fourth of July!

Linda