Tuesday Travels: Quebec City, Setting for Rogue’s Hostage #HistoricalRomance #99cents

Tuesday Travels

Quebec is one of the settings used in my French & Indian War-set historical romance, Rogue’s Hostage. When I was writing the book, my husband and I took a vacation to Quebec Province so I could do some research. We started in Montreal, where I managed to find my way around the Metro using my college French. (Note: I took this trip back in the pre-digital photography days so the photos are from my Art Explosion CD collection.)

Quebec panorama

 

Chareau Frontenac

Hotel Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, Canada

After a couple of days we took the train to Quebec, and I fell in love with the charming old city, though I had to keep reminding myself that the city in my book was the previous city, the one that was destroyed by the British shelling.

Since I wanted to stay in the old part of the city, I booked us a room at Chateau Frontenac, the venerable Canadian Railway hotel. Picturesque setting, but we were pretty sure they gave us the smallest room in the place! Instead of a view looking out toward the river, our window looked down onto an alley. Oh, well, we didn’t spend much time in the room anyway.

We were far more interested in wandering the streets, taking pictures of the old houses and the fort and battlefield, which plays a part in my book, as does the lovely church pictured below.

battlefied

On the last day we took a boat ride on the St. Lawrence for the spectacular views of the city and countryside. What a beautiful area! I’d love to go back some day.

Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church

Quebec, Canada – August 21th, 2009 : tourists visiting the old church of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires in Place Royale of Quebec city downtown under cloudy sky. Construction was started in 1687 .UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

But the Canadian border is still closed as I write this, at least until July 21st. (I can’t believe I am writing that. The idea of the border between Canada and the U.S. being closed for a year or more would have been a foreign concept before Covid-19!)

In the meantime, you can explore the Pennsylvania frontier and the old city of Quebec in the pages of Rogue’s Hostage. It’s on a 99 cent Kindle Countdown Deal in the US and UK through the end of the day, Wed. July 7th. My apologies to my Canadian readers. Amazon doesn’t have Kindle Countdown Deals in Canada yet. Some day, I hope.

Rogue's Hostage Kindle Countdown Deal July 1-8, 2021

Buy now from Amazon or read free with Kindle Unlimited.

Amazon.com
Amazon AU
Amazon CA
Amazon UK

Where are you going this summer? I recently traveled to Boston, Cape Cod and New York. I’ll be sharing details of my trips in upcoming Tuesday Travels posts.

Linda

A Look Back at #MemorialDay #history

Memorial Day graphic

When we have a three-day weekend, it’s easy to ignore the reason for the day off, but in the case of Memorial Day, we should remember why we celebrate.

The holiday started in the years immediately following the Civil War, the most destructive conflict in our country’s history. Hardly a family or community went unaffected by that terrible war. Two of my ancestors fought for the Union. One was wounded at Gettysburg, the other at the Battle of the Wilderness. The latter lived into his 80’s with a bullet lodged in one knee.

His rifle stayed in the family and was eventually passed down to me. I display it proudly in my family room.

1859 Sharps Rifle

Model 1859 Sharps Rifle carried by my ancestor throughout the Civil War

As early as 1866, people gathered flowers in spring to decorate the graves of the fallen. For decades the holiday was knows as Decoration Day, but after World War II, Memorial Day stuck. In 1866, President Johnson declared the town of Waterloo, New York to be the beginning of the Memorial Day holiday, but other cities make competing claims.

In the South, states set aside alternate dates to honor the Confederate dead. It wasn’t until after World War I that all states began celebrating on the same day, May 30, and people began honoring the dead of all American wars, not just the Civil War.

In 1968 Congress passed the law that created three-day weekends, and since then Memorial Day has been celebrated on the last Monday in May. This year the last Monday happens to be May 31st.

Ceremonies take place at veteran’s cemeteries across the nation, including the big event at Arlington National Cemetery, which I visited in April 2019. The trees were in bloom, and the cemetery was lovely and peaceful.

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery, April 2019

History.com has an interesting article about Memorial Day, including a video showing the ceremony in 1936 presided over by FDR and with prescient remarks from General John Pershing that foreshadowed WWII.

Have fun, but don’t forget why we celebrate.

Linda