Tuesday Travels: Quebec City, Setting for Rogue’s Hostage #HistoricalRomance #99cents

Tuesday Travels

Quebec is one of the settings used in my French & Indian War-set historical romance, Rogue’s Hostage. When I was writing the book, my husband and I took a vacation to Quebec Province so I could do some research. We started in Montreal, where I managed to find my way around the Metro using my college French. (Note: I took this trip back in the pre-digital photography days so the photos are from my Art Explosion CD collection.)

Quebec panorama

 

Chareau Frontenac

Hotel Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, Canada

After a couple of days we took the train to Quebec, and I fell in love with the charming old city, though I had to keep reminding myself that the city in my book was the previous city, the one that was destroyed by the British shelling.

Since I wanted to stay in the old part of the city, I booked us a room at Chateau Frontenac, the venerable Canadian Railway hotel. Picturesque setting, but we were pretty sure they gave us the smallest room in the place! Instead of a view looking out toward the river, our window looked down onto an alley. Oh, well, we didn’t spend much time in the room anyway.

We were far more interested in wandering the streets, taking pictures of the old houses and the fort and battlefield, which plays a part in my book, as does the lovely church pictured below.

battlefied

On the last day we took a boat ride on the St. Lawrence for the spectacular views of the city and countryside. What a beautiful area! I’d love to go back some day.

Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church

Quebec, Canada – August 21th, 2009 : tourists visiting the old church of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires in Place Royale of Quebec city downtown under cloudy sky. Construction was started in 1687 .UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

But the Canadian border is still closed as I write this, at least until July 21st. (I can’t believe I am writing that. The idea of the border between Canada and the U.S. being closed for a year or more would have been a foreign concept before Covid-19!)

In the meantime, you can explore the Pennsylvania frontier and the old city of Quebec in the pages of Rogue’s Hostage. It’s on a 99 cent Kindle Countdown Deal in the US and UK through the end of the day, Wed. July 7th. My apologies to my Canadian readers. Amazon doesn’t have Kindle Countdown Deals in Canada yet. Some day, I hope.

Rogue's Hostage Kindle Countdown Deal July 1-8, 2021

Buy now from Amazon or read free with Kindle Unlimited.

Amazon.com
Amazon AU
Amazon CA
Amazon UK

Where are you going this summer? I recently traveled to Boston, Cape Cod and New York. I’ll be sharing details of my trips in upcoming Tuesday Travels posts.

Linda

Dublin’s Easter Rebellion Redux #TuesdayTravels #Ireland

Tuesday Travels

I haven’t done a Tuesday Travels post in a while but today we’re revisiting Dublin in honor of the 105th anniversary of Ireland’s Easter Rebellion.

The uprising began on April 24, 1916 while the United Kingdom was in the midst of World War I. Rebels from the secretive Irish Republican Brotherhood, led by Patrick Pearse, streamed into Dublin from the countryside. The armed men attacked government buildings and seized the General Post Office. After initial success, they declared Irish independence.

Dublin post office

The historic General Post Office, Dublin, Ireland.

However, the British launched a counteroffensive and the rebellion was crushed after only five days. The Irish people were initially not supportive of the rebellion, but the harsh measures meted out to the rebels stirred public resentment. The leaders of the uprising, including Pearse and James Connolly, were executed and became instant martyrs. When I visited Dublin Castle, we learned about the execution of the prisoners and visited a room dedicated to their memory.

Armed protests broke out and in 1921, a vote was held. 26 of Ireland’s 32 counties voted for independence and the Irish Republic was born. The other counties remain part of Northern Ireland, in the United Kingdom.

Statue of Michael Collins

When I was in Ireland, we took a day excursion to west County Cork where I saw this statue of Michael Collins, who participated in the Easter Rebellion and went on to be a leader of Sinn Fein and the Irish Republican Army. In Jan. 22, he became Chairman of the Provisional Government of the Irish Free State until his assassination in August 1922.

Irish history is turbulent and disturbing, but quite fascinating. I’d love to see more of the Emerald Isle some day.

Linda